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Thread: quiz and erebus questions......9 to 20 senses and a few other mistakes

  1. #41
    To convert a ratio to a percentage you take the first number in the ratio, divide it by the second number, and then multiply by 100, appending a percent sign at the end.
    Example: 3:1 as a percent would be 3/1 = 3 then 3 x 100 = 300. So the ratio would be 300%. Now for the 1:2 ratio you would take 1 and divide it by 2, which would give you 0.5. now you multiply 0.5 by 100 to get the percent, which is 50%

  2. #42
    Squire of Statements RealChaosblade is just another poster. For now.... RealChaosblade's Avatar
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    wow this is almost funny now
    Last edited by RealChaosblade; 04-03-2014 at 04:29 PM.

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Sslaykth View Post
    To convert a ratio to a percentage you take the first number in the ratio, divide it by the second number, and then multiply by 100, appending a percent sign at the end.
    Example: 3:1 as a percent would be 3/1 = 3 then 3 x 100 = 300. So the ratio would be 300%. Now for the 1:2 ratio you would take 1 and divide it by 2, which would give you 0.5. now you multiply 0.5 by 100 to get the percent, which is 50%
    you CAN do this only when you have groups of same things, for example if you have 50 apples and if you want to know what percentage 10 apples are.
    you CANT use this if you have 2 or more groups of things, for example if you have 50 apples and 10 oranges and you want to know what percentage are oranges.

  4. #44
    lol seriously think u are all bieng trolled by this guy...becuase no matter what you till him, and that everyone disagree. he still argues.

    the question ask for a percentage. So you do still have to look a the whole...cant have more then a 100%.

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Ceriss View Post
    you CAN do this only when you have groups of same things, for example if you have 50 apples and if you want to know what percentage 10 apples are.
    you CANT use this if you have 2 or more groups of things, for example if you have 50 apples and 10 oranges and you want to know what percentage are oranges.
    Ok. But the question asks you to convert the ratio 1:2 into a percentage. There is not mention of apples or oranges, it is just to simply convert 1:2 into a percentage. And by doing so, you get 50 percent (50%). The answer is just as basic as the question.
    Last edited by Sslaykth; 04-03-2014 at 03:36 PM.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Correllian View Post
    what you are listing are not ratios. a ration in words would be closest to 1 to 2 for 1:2. It is basic mathematics and 1:2 is not one out of the total of both numbers but 1 compared to 2 you do not add the first and second number together, the second number is a value unto itself. to list 1:2 and magically change the 2 to a three by combining them is not correct mathematics, that is not a ratio so if someone is a "professor of maths" then maybe you need to review what a ratio written as they are would solve as, or not lie. as to the probability it was from someone using a coin flip as an example which would be a probability.

    As to the senses, again that is an extrapolation from the accepted 5 and to list more than the answer could be in the thousands since all the others are simply extensions of the accepted 5. If the answers are not based on the accepted scientific definition then the answer could be anything.


    hmm http://www.virtualnerd.com/common-co...ent-part-whole

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Sslaykth View Post
    Ok. But the question asks you to convert the ratio 1:2 into a percentage. There is not mention of apples or oranges, it is just to simply convert 1:2 into a percentage. And by doing so, you get 50 percent (50%). The answer is just as basic as the question.
    the "problem" here is that 1:2 means 1 point of one thing and 2 points of other thing.
    Now you have 2 different things, so you cant use the first option. The only option left is the second one.

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Ceriss View Post
    the "problem" here is that 1:2 means 1 point of one thing and 2 points of other thing.
    Now you have 2 different things, so you cant use the first option. The only option left is the second one.
    Here is another basic example using the 1:2 ratio:

    You play hockey, you have 1 win and 2 losses. Now just comparing the two, your win percentage would be 0.50 (50%).

    What you're thinking is this:

    You play hockey and your team has played 3 games. Your team won 1 and lost 2. Now your total win percentage would be 0.3333333 (33.3%).

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by R23577093 View Post
    lol seriously think u are all bieng trolled by this guy...becuase no matter what you till him, and that everyone disagree. he still argues.

    the question ask for a percentage. So you do still have to look a the whole...cant have more then a 100%.
    The percentage in a ratio is the percentage of one value compared with the other, not of the total of the 2 values. Secondly you can absolutely have more than 100%. If you had a job where you were paid $100 a week and, if you got a new job and were paid $200 a week your income would be 200% of the previous one. new income compared to old income as a ratio 2:1 or 200%, or if you reverse it old income compared to new income 1:2. or 50%. Ratios as percentages at work

    So many people on here do not know mathematics, continue to argue even when I present teachers, tutors, mathematicians, mathematic worksheets, and calculators. Ratios are not a mathematical representation of what you think they are.

  10. #50
    1/3=x/100
    Cross multiply to be fancy:
    100=3x
    100/3= 33.3%
    Sorry I did it the long way just so you know.

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